Tangled Life of Le Tang

Story Artist @ Dreamworks Animation Studios

giancarlovolpe:

A little behind the scenes look of the early stages of Green Lantern the Animated Series.

My eternal gratitude to everyone who helped prove the doubters wrong.

(via rufftoon)

I was never much of a video gamer, but the Zelda games (the environments, the mythologies, the stories) hooked me.  I did this sketch study that I would like to turn into a more refined piece.

I was never much of a video gamer, but the Zelda games (the environments, the mythologies, the stories) hooked me.  I did this sketch study that I would like to turn into a more refined piece.

kyletwebster:

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I want!

That’s probably what happened.

That’s probably what happened.

I know more about some celebrities then I do my own family.

I know more about some celebrities then I do my own family.

Anonymous asked: Okay so something that has always made me curious is how do people develop their drawing styles? I've mostly drawn things other people draw by copying thwm and when I draw without copying anything it doesn't look as good as it usually does so how did you develop your drawing style?

You can learn a great deal from mimicking somebody, but you end up just understanding their interpretation, how they draw a woman, how they draw a car, how they draw a hand, etc. You don’t want to be just a copy of someone, you want to add your uniqueness to your style. So I would highly recommend drawing from life, real people, real trees, etc. Studying real life is where your favorite artists got started too most likely. They just eventually developed their own way of depicting reality.  

And I would also recommend not just copying someone else’s work, but being thoughtful of the decisions that they made.  Looking at the nuances in their drawing, considering what they did and how that changes and informs the feeling of the artwork.  Thoughtful drawing is the key, not merely the physical act of copying, but considering the choices that were made.

So draw and observe… a lot.  Keeping at it can be very frustrating and intimidating, because it may take a good amount of time and effort to improve, but good things take time and work.  Here’s a clip of Ira Glass speaking, more eloquently than I ever could, about staying on your creative path:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbC4gqZGPSY#t=103

I hope this was helpful!

Le

Spacing matters…

Spacing matters…

Heyoooooo!

Heyoooooo!

letangles:

I recently watched “Ernest & Celestine,” this amazing French-Belgiam film.  It’s based on a series of children’s books of the same name published by the Belgian author and illustrator Gabrielle Vincent.  It was beautifully done and so full of charm.  Here’s a link to the trailer (link).  Bask in it’s beauty… baaaasssskkk.

Find it in a theater near you: www.ernestandcelestine.com

letangles:

I recently watched “Ernest & Celestine,” this amazing French-Belgiam film.  It’s based on a series of children’s books of the same name published by the Belgian author and illustrator Gabrielle VincentIt was beautifully done and so full of charm.  Here’s a link to the trailer (link).  Bask in it’s beauty… baaaasssskkk.

Find it in a theater near you: www.ernestandcelestine.com